Man-In-The-Barrel. A Case of Cervical Spinal Cord Infarction and Review of the Literature



María José García Antelo*, Teresa Lema Facal, Tamara Pablos Sánchez, María Soledad López Facal , Eduardo Rubio Nazabal
Servicio de Neurología, Complexo Hospitalario Universitario A Coruña, C/ As Xubias, s/n. Código Postal 15006. A Coruña, Spain


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© Antelo et al.; Licensee Bentham Open.

open-access license: This is an open access article licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/) which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the work is properly cited.

* Address correspondence to this author at the Servicio de Neurología. Complexo Hospitalario Universitario A Coruña. C/ As Xubias, s/n. Código Postal 15006. A Coruña, Spain; Tel: 657091302; Fax: 981178001; E-mail: marigaran@yahoo.es


Abstract

Introduction:

Man-in-the-barrel syndrome was initially observed in patients with signs of serious cerebral hypoperfusion, in the border zone of the anterior and medial cerebral artery, but other causes were communicated later.

Methods:

a healthy 43-year-old woman who showed intense cervical pain, irradiating over both shoulders and arms. Physical examination on admission highlighted notable brachial diparesis, tacto-algesic hypoesthesia of both arms and sensory level C4-D9.

Results:

cervical Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) on admission revealed a hyperintense intramedullar lesion at C3-C7 level, due to a cervical cord infarction.

Conclusions:

our case reveals that conventional neurological consideration about the specific anatomical location of man-in-the-barrel syndrome in the brain should be extended to other locations such as the cervical column and not only the brain area.

Keywords: Spinal cord infarction, man-in-the-barrel, brachial diplegia, stroke.