CASE REPORT


Blood Viscosity and its Clinical Implications in Ischemic Stroke and Chronic Heart Failure: Insights from a Case Report



Al Rasyid1, *, Julia Remi Chandra1, Salim Harris1, Mohammad Kurniawan1, Rakhmad Hidayat1, Muhammad Yamin2, Elvan Wiyarta3
1 Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Indonesia-Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Central Jakarta, Jakarta 10430, Indonesia
2 Department of Cardiology and Vascular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Indonesia-Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Central Jakarta, Jakarta 10430, Indonesia
3 Department of Medical Science, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Indonesia-Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Central Jakarta, Jakarta 10430, Indonesia


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© 2024 The Author(s). Published by Bentham Open.

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* Address correspondence to this author at the Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Indonesia-Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Central Jakarta, Jakarta 10430, Indonesia; E-mail: al-rasyid@ui.ac.id


Abstract

Background

Blood viscosity has received increased attention as a potential predictor of ischemic stroke risk, particularly in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). Despite the importance of this link, there has been a notable paucity of comprehensive research on the subject. Hence, the major goal of this study was to shed light on the potential importance of blood viscosity in individuals with ischemic stroke and CHF.

Case Presentation

An 85-year-old male was presented to the emergency department after three days of gradually decreasing consciousness. His medical history included hypertension and CHF. His Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) was determined to be E2M5V3, and he displayed evidence of upper motor neuron facial palsy as well as right hemiparesis. The clinical assessment scores, which included the NIHSS and mRS, were 10 and 4, respectively. MRI imaging confirmed the existence of several acute infarctions. Other diagnostic procedures, including an x-ray, revealed cardiomegaly and echocardiographic findings were compatible with grade I diastolic dysfunction. His blood viscosity was 8.19 cP, which was much higher than normal. The patient was diagnosed with ischemic stroke, CHF, and hyperviscosity based on these findings. Despite a small increase in blood viscosity to 8.16 cP after a six-day treatment session, the patient showed significant clinical improvement. Unfortunately, he was readmitted immediately after being discharged and died three days later.

Conclusion

This case demonstrates the importance of blood viscosity in the evaluation and prognosis of patients with ischemic stroke and CHF.

Keywords: Blood viscosity, Ischemic stroke, CHF, Glasgow coma scale, Heart failure, Stroke.