RESEARCH ARTICLE


Correlation of Serum Uric Acid with Cognition, Severity, and Stage of Disease in Patients with Idiopathic Parkinson’s Disease and Vascular Parkinsonism: A Cross-Sectional Study



Zulkifli Misri1, Shashank Pillarisetti2, Pradeepa Nayak3, 6, Amreen Mahmood3, 6, *, Safwan Ahmed4, Bhaskaran Unnikrishnan5
1 Neurology, Kasturba Medical College, Mangalore, Manipal Academy of Higher Education, Manipal, Karnataka, India
2 Neurology, Krishna Institute & Medical Sciences Hospital, Rajahmundry, Andhra Pradesh, India
3 Physiotherapy, Kasturba Medical College, Mangalore, Manipal Academy of Higher Education, Manipal, Karnataka, India
4 Neurology, Father Muller Medical College, Mangalore, Karnataka, India
5 Community Medicine, Kasturba Medical College, Mangalore, Manipal Academy of Higher Education, Manipal, Karnataka, India
6 Department of Health Professions, Manchester Metropolitan University, Birley Fields Campus, Bonsall Street, M15 6GX, Manchester, United Kingdom


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Creative Commons License
© 2022 Misriet al.

open-access license: This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Public License (CC-BY 4.0), a copy of which is available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/legalcode. This license permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

* Address correspondence to this author at the Department Physiotherapy, Kasturba Medical College, Mangalore, Manipal Academy of Higher Education, Manipal, Karnataka, India, 575001; Tel: +91-9873939367; E-mail: amreen.mahmood@manipal.edu


Abstract

Background:

Uric acid (UA) being a potent antioxidant may reduce the oxidative stress and progression of Parkinson’s disease. However, the role of UA is not yet established in people with Idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (IPD) and Vascular Parkinsonism (VP).

Objectives:

We aimed i) to compare the serum UA levels in IPD, VP, and healthy adults and ii) to find a relation between UA levels with disease severity, disease stage, and cognitive function in people with IPD and VP.

Methods:

A cross-sectional study was conducted among people with IPD (n=70), VP (n=70), and healthy adults (n=70). Demographics details, body mass index, duration of illness, levodopa usage, comorbidities, MDS-UPDRS scores, modified H&Y scale, MMSE, and serum UA levels were collected from participants. Pearson’s correlation coefficient was used to find the correlation between UA levels, MDS-UPDRS, H & Y, and MMSE scores.

Results:

The age of the participants ranged from 59 to 80 years. Results showed that serum UA level in healthy control (5.41±0.99; p=0.001) and VP groups (5.27 ± 0.99; p=0.001) were significantly higher compared to IPD group (4.34 ±1.03). We found a significant negative correlation between UA and MDS-UPDRS (r=-0.68, p<0.01) and H & Y scores (r = -0.61, p<0.01) and a significant positive correlation of UA with MMSE (r=0.55, p<0.01) in the IPD group. UA levels in the VP group were not correlated with any of the outcome measures.

Conclusion:

In people with IPD, serum UA level was negatively correlated with severity and progression of the disease but positively correlated with cognitive ability.

Keywords: Parkinson’s Disease, Antioxidant, Uric acid, Disease progression, Neuromodulation, Cognitive ability.