Postural Control of Healthy Elderly Individuals Compared to Elderly Individuals with Stroke Sequelae



Fábio Marcon Alfieri1, 2, *, Marcelo Riberto3, José Augusto Fernandes Lopes1, Thais Raquel Filippo1, Marta Imamura1, Linamara Rizzo Battistella1
1 Clinical Research Center - Institute of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Sao Paulo School of Medicine, São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
2 Health Promotion Course and Physical Therapy Faculty - São Paulo Adventist University Center, São Paulo, Brazil
3 Ribeirão Preto Medical School, University of São Paulo, Brazil


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© Alfieri et al.; Licensee Bentham Open.

open-access license: This is an open access article licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial 4.0 International Public License (CC BY-NC 4.0) (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/legalcode), which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the work is properly cited.

* Address correspondence to this author at the Clinical Research Center - Institute of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Sao Paulo School of Medicine, São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; Tel: 55 (11) 3905-8616; E-mails: fabioalfieri@usp.br, fabio.alfieri@unasp.edu.br


Abstract

A stroke and aging process can modify the postural control. We aimed to compare the postural control of health elderly individuals to that of individuals with stroke sequelae. This cross-sectional transversal study was made with individuals capable of walking without any assistance and that were considered clinically stable. The study had 18 individuals in the group with stroke sequelae (SG) and 34 in the healthy elderly control group (CG). The participants were evaluated for the timed up and go test (TUG) and force platform. The SG showed the worst results in relation to the time of execution of the TUG and the force platform evaluation. The displacement of center of pressure was worse for both groups in the eyes-closed situation, especially in the anteroposterior direction for the CG. The GS showed worse results in the static and dynamic postural control. The healthy elderly showed more dependence on sight to maintain their static balance and there was no difference in the balance tests in relation to the side affected by the stroke.

Keywords: Balance, Functional mobility, Older adults, Stroke, Sequelae, TUG.